Sweet chilli, ginger and spring onion mahi-mahi parcels

by Jeanne on August 8, 2008

in Recipes - fish, Recipes - gluten-free

20080616 MahiMahiTitle

Opposites attract, so they say.  And I do think that this time “they” may be on to something.  How else could you explain the enduring attraction of men to women and vice versa?  It certainly isn’t because they share sooooo many similarities – biped, air-breathing mammal is about as far as the similarities go!

I have written before about how amusingly different we can sometimes be, and somehow the culinary world is second only to the world of personal hygiene in terms of throwing a spotlight on our differences.

For example, I read about the global shortage of basics such as wheat and rice, and come home resolving to waste less food and shun biofuels that divert resources from food production.  Nick reads the same news and comes home with… a 10kg bag of rice and a 3kg bag of pasta.  For two people.

Anybody got an eco-friendly remedy for keeping weevils at bay?!

Or I’ll go shopping for fish and spend half an hour haranguing some poor supermarket employee about whether the salmon is farmed or wild; how the tuna was caught; and whether this cod is from sustainable stocks.  Nick goes shopping, laughs hysterically at the price of sustainable, farmed cod, and comes home with two mahi-mahi fillets.  Sustainability?  Food miles?  Who knows, but hey, they were half price!!

Bless their little uncomplicated hearts.

Thankfully, according to the MSC, mahi-mahi are fished within sustainable levels in ways that don’t cause excessive environmental damage.  They rate them a 2 on a scale where 5 equals “don’t eat under any circumstances!” - so big sigh of relief there!  However, seeing as they thrive in tropical and subtropical waters, the food miles issue is another story… but by this time it was too late – the fish was already in my fridge and the carbon emissions had already been generated.  Nothing for it but to eat the little blighters.

Mahi-mahi is also called pompano and dorado and when it’s alive it is a beautifully coloured game fish.  Like tuna and swordfish, the flesh is very firm and steak-like rather than flaky, so I was slightly worried about it being dry when cooked. I could have seared it briefly in my griddle pan, but this would have entailed making some sort of salsa and I was feeling lazy.  In the end I went for Asian-inspired flavours and cooked the fish in foil parcels in the oven, so it remained not only flavoursome but also beautifully moist. While the fish was in the oven I steamed some asparagus (served on the side, doused in soy sauce and sesame seeds) and boiled some jasmine rice.  Hey presto – the quickest dinner imagineable and a wonderful way to serve this fish.  If you were serving it for friends, making the parcels out of baking paper would make for a very pretty plate indeed.

SWEET CHILLI, GINGER AND SPRING ONION MAHI-MAHI PARCELS (serves 2)

Ingredients:

600-700g fresh mahi-mahi fillets
sesame oil
1 large spring onion (mine was HUGE!), sliced
sweet chilli sauce
1 tsp fresh grated ginger
salt and pepper

Method:

Pre-heat the oven to 180C.  Rinse the fillets and pat dry.

Brush the fillets on both sides with a little sesame oil and lay the fillets in the middle of a square of baking paper or foil large enough to wrap them in.

Sprinkle with salt and pepper (I may also have added dill, looking at the picture – use your discretion!).  Scatter the grated ginger evenly over the fish and give each fillet a generous splash of sweet chilli sauce.  Scatter the thinly sliced spring onion slices on top.

Wrap the fish into sealed parcels, leaving a little pocket of air between the topping and the foil/paper so that all the topping does not stick to the wrapping.  Place parcels on a baking sheet in the pre-heated oven for 12-15 minutes or until just cooked.

Serve on rice, taking care not to waste any of the cooking juices in the parcel.

Because this meal was both Asian-inspired and surprisingly speedy, I am submitting it to Jaden of Steamy Kitchen who is celebrating her birthday today by running a competition for the best 15-minute Asian-inspired dish.  Happy birthday Jaden :)

Elsewhere on the food blogs…

Kalyn made soy-grilled mahi-mahi with a Korean dipping sauce

Vanessa made roast mahi-mahi with fennel, olives and orange

Katie made mahi-mahi with blood orange, avocado and red onion salsa

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Leave a Comment

{ 18 comments… read them below or add one }

justfoodnow August 8, 2008 at 7:34 pm

Hi,
As usual, your recipes are outstanding which why, when faced with a mountain of beautiful fresh chilli’s, I immediately thought of you – please please can you do something to give us a recipe for sweet chilli sauce?

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Susan from Food Blogga August 8, 2008 at 10:40 pm

There is something so appealing about the word “parcels” in recipes. Not that this recipe needs to be any more appealing! Sweet and spicy sauces like this are a go-to in our house. I love them on fish, meat or veggies.

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Kevin August 9, 2008 at 2:07 am

This sounds really good! I have been wanting to try mahi mahi for while now. Baking the fish in a parcel means less dishes to clean as well.

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Deeba August 9, 2008 at 2:16 am

Hi Jeanne, this did make for very interesting reading. How true that opposites attract & how different perspectives can be. I’m too forever on this ‘save the environment & fuel trail’…but will go with your better half on the fish & the grain. Here in India, they use dried leaves of the ‘neem’ tree, known for its medicinal value, to keep weevils at bay. I love the simplicity of these parcels & the beautiful marriage of flavours…delicious!

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dawnielle August 9, 2008 at 7:12 am

before i read susan’s comment my thought was the same, parcel, cute little delivery of fish. the jury is still out on opposites…yes they attract. but how long can they survive without adoring the same foods???????? ha ha

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Antonia August 9, 2008 at 9:49 am

Lovely fishy parcels. I’ve not tried mahi-mahi but this speedy dish sounds great. If I can’t get hold of any, I might try this with swordfish.

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Jaden August 9, 2008 at 2:54 pm

Wonderful recipe! Thanks for playing. I loooove sweet chili sauce.

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cookinpanda August 9, 2008 at 5:30 pm

Fish in a flavorful parcel. yes, please. I can imagine the burst of flavor that comes out of this little mahi mahi pack. I cannot wait to tryit!

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courtney August 9, 2008 at 7:00 pm

I am lovin this dish. Its is funny how both sexes react and view things. But somehow it all works out. As for the rice and pasta all I can think of is getting a big airtight plastic storage bin . Most likely not eco friendly, but can used over and over.

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Claudia August 9, 2008 at 9:12 pm

A great combination of ingredients! Thank you. What we often do here in Hawaii (and elsewhere I’m sure) is to wrap the filling first in banana leaf or ti and then the foil. Gives a subtle nice flavor as well as protecting from any aluminum.

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Sally D August 9, 2008 at 9:53 pm

Hi Jeanne, these look gorgeous. As for the weevils, best thing you can do is repackage as much as you have space for, and shove it in the freezer. I’ve got mini-beetles as soon as I put rice, flour or pasta in the cupboard …and as soon as we get rid of them, Pick N Pay sends some more. As for the rest, maybe just think like a Zimbabwean and find someone who hasn’t got a mountain of pasta, to do a trade deal. Or just give it away!!
Sally D, Somerset West

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Lyn August 10, 2008 at 12:25 pm

Your blog is one of the first that I read when I log on each day. Thank you for the lovely recipes and interesting content – I’m from South Africa, now living in the UK, and love being reminded of my days in my former homecountry. My tip for keeping weevils at bay is to insert a bayleaf into the flour or rice. So far, I’ve not had any of these gogga’s.

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nina August 10, 2008 at 5:10 pm

LAST WEEK WAS SO HECTIC THAT I KEPT ON COMING TO YOUR SITE, BUT NEVER LEFT A COMMENT. SORRY ABOUT THAT. MY HUB AND I ARE SO OPPOSITE THAT IT SOMETIMES SCARES ME. HE IS THE ONE WHO CARES ABOUT CARBON FOOTPRINTS AND STUFF WHILE I FOCUS ON PEOPLE AND WILL JUST ABOUT DO ANYTHING TO FULFILL THEIR NEEDS. DES SOMETIMES GOES DEEPFISHING AND THEN THEY COME HOME WITH WHOLE TUNA AND ONCE EVEN A DORADO…..I MADE CAPE MALAY CURRY FISH ONE NIGHT AT TEN AND MADE FISH PATEE FOR A NATION….THESE PARCELS LOOK GREAT!

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Darius T. Williams August 10, 2008 at 8:52 pm

yes, very appealing dish…and it looks hella good too!
-DTW
http://www.everydaycookin.blogspot.com

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kittie August 11, 2008 at 12:54 pm

Lol – I’ve never tried mahi mahi just because of the airmiles, so I know what you mean. Great recipe anyway ;)
Oh, and thanks for the link to the Fish to Eat page – I hadn’t seen that one before!

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Annemarie August 11, 2008 at 10:15 pm

A fresh and simple combination, but I think simple is always best with fish. I don’t think I’ve ever tried mahi mahi even though it’s on offer pretty readily these days. Looks yummy…

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Dragon August 15, 2008 at 4:21 am

Sweet chilli, ginger and spring onion would taste great on anything. YUM!!

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invertir forex February 8, 2010 at 5:02 am

I look forward to reading more on the topic in the future. Keep up the good work! This blog is going to be great resource. Love reading it.

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